Robin Hood didn’t rob the rich, or the banks for that matter

Now there has been some talk in the newspapers and blogs about a Robin Hood tax that is being supported by a bunch of the acting world.  The idea is that a small % of bank profits, say 0.005%, would be taxed in order to give to worthy charities (who decides who is worthy?).  Now this idea is being thoroughly torn apart elsewhere.  A) It’s immoral, your taxing every depositor’s investment, not just some cartoon fat cat dreamt up by some lazy luvvie actor.  B) The cost will, as always, be passed on to the consumer, either in higher rates for loans, lower rates of interest paid, higher charges etc.  C)  If it’s only applied in one jurisdiction, what are the odds banks will expand their operations there?  So, if in the UK for example, you will slow growth of one our most important industries, preventing the creation of future jobs and higher normal tax revenue.

I don’t want to go into too much detail on what’s wrong with this tax.  What I do want to briefly highlight the thing that pisses me off most here.  The besmirching of Robin Hood’s legend.

Now you, like I, probably grew up hearing Robin Hood’s activities described as “robbing from the rich, giving to the poor”.  I would like to call bullshit.  This lefty tripe you have been fed is bollocks.  Robin Hood didn’t rob from the rich.  He robbed from the state.  That’s right.  Prince John was raising taxes to pay for his older brother’s shenanigans in the middle east, hitting the poor hard.  Robin, so the legend goes, would rob the tax collectors and return the money to the poor.  Robin Hood stole from the tax collector and gave to the tax payer.

If the bored thespians of the world want to start robbing the government and giving it back to the taxed, I’m all for it.  In fact, they needn’t go so far to gain my respect.  They just have to stop begging and screaming that the government has to give them some more tax-funded subsidies.

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